Here are the books I am reading this month!!!

Before Amen by Max Lucado
We all pray … some.

We pray to stay sober, centered, or solvent. When the lump is deemed malignant. When the money runs out before the month does. When the marriage is falling apart. We pray.

But wouldn’t we like to pray more? Better? Stronger? With more fire, faith, and fervency?

Yet we have kids to feed, bills to pay, deadlines to meet. The calendar pounces on our good intentions like a tiger on a rabbit. And what about our checkered history with prayer? Uncertain words. Unmet expectations. Unanswered requests.

We aren’t the first to struggle with prayer. The first followers of Jesus needed prayer guidance too. In fact, prayer is the only tutorial they ever requested.

And Jesus gave them a prayer. Not a lecture on prayer. Not the doctrine of prayer. He gave them a quotable, repeatable, portable prayer. Couldn’t we use the same?

In Before Amen best-selling author Max Lucado joins readers on a journey to the very heart of biblical prayer, offering hope for doubts and confidence even for prayer wimps. Distilling prayers in the Bible down to one pocket-sized prayer, Max reminds readers that prayer is not a privilege for the pious nor the art of a chosen few. Prayer is simply a heartfelt conversation between God and his child. Let the conversation begin.

Asylum by Madeleine Roux

Asylum is a thrilling and creepy photo-novel perfect for fans of the New York Times bestseller Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children.

For sixteen-year-old Dan Crawford, New Hampshire College Prep is more than a summer program—it’s a lifeline. An outcast at his high school, Dan is excited to finally make some friends in his last summer before college. But when he arrives at the program, Dan learns that his dorm for the summer used to be a sanatorium, more commonly known as an asylum. And not just any asylum—a last resort for the criminally insane.

As Dan and his new friends, Abby and Jordan, explore the hidden recesses of their creepy summer home, they soon discover it’s no coincidence that the three of them ended up here. Because the asylum holds the key to a terrifying past. And there are some secrets that refuse to stay buried.

Featuring found photos of unsettling history and real abandoned asylums and filled with chilling mystery and page-turning suspense, Madeleine Roux’s teen debut, Asylum, is a horror story that treads the line between genius and insanity.

The Demonologist by Andrew Pyper 


Professor David Ullman is among the world’s leading authorities on demonic literature, with special expertise in Milton’s Paradise Lost. Not that David is a believer—he sees what he teaches as a branch of the imagination and nothing more. So when the mysterious Thin Woman arrives at his office and invites him to travel to Venice and witness a “phenomenon,” he turns her down. She leaves plane tickets and an address on his desk, advising David that her employer is not often disappointed. 

That evening, David’s wife announces she is leaving him. With his life suddenly in shambles, he impulsively whisks his beloved twelve-year-old daughter, Tess, off to Venice after all. The girl has recently been stricken by the same melancholy moods David knows so well, and he hopes to cheer her up and distract them both from the troubles at home. 

But what happens in Venice will change everything. 

First, in a tiny attic room at the address provided by the Thin Woman, David sees a man restrained in a chair, muttering, clearly insane… but could he truly be possessed? Then the man speaks clearly, in the voice of David’s dead father, repeating the last words he ever spoke to his son. Words that have left scars—and a mystery—behind. 

When David rushes back to the hotel, he discovers Tess perched on the roof’s edge, high above the waters of the Grand Canal. Before she falls, she manages to utter a final plea: Find me. 

What follows is an unimaginable journey for David Ullman from skeptic to true believer. In a terrifying quest guided by symbols and riddles from the pages of Paradise Lost, David must track the demon that has captured his daughter and discover its name. If he fails, he will lose Tess forever.

Here are the books I am reading this month!!!

Before Amen by Max Lucado
We all pray … some.

We pray to stay sober, centered, or solvent. When the lump is deemed malignant. When the money runs out before the month does. When the marriage is falling apart. We pray.

But wouldn’t we like to pray more? Better? Stronger? With more fire, faith, and fervency?

Yet we have kids to feed, bills to pay, deadlines to meet. The calendar pounces on our good intentions like a tiger on a rabbit. And what about our checkered history with prayer? Uncertain words. Unmet expectations. Unanswered requests.

We aren’t the first to struggle with prayer. The first followers of Jesus needed prayer guidance too. In fact, prayer is the only tutorial they ever requested.

And Jesus gave them a prayer. Not a lecture on prayer. Not the doctrine of prayer. He gave them a quotable, repeatable, portable prayer. Couldn’t we use the same?

In Before Amen best-selling author Max Lucado joins readers on a journey to the very heart of biblical prayer, offering hope for doubts and confidence even for prayer wimps. Distilling prayers in the Bible down to one pocket-sized prayer, Max reminds readers that prayer is not a privilege for the pious nor the art of a chosen few. Prayer is simply a heartfelt conversation between God and his child. Let the conversation begin.

Asylum by Madeleine Roux

Asylum is a thrilling and creepy photo-novel perfect for fans of the New York Times bestseller Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children.

For sixteen-year-old Dan Crawford, New Hampshire College Prep is more than a summer program—it’s a lifeline. An outcast at his high school, Dan is excited to finally make some friends in his last summer before college. But when he arrives at the program, Dan learns that his dorm for the summer used to be a sanatorium, more commonly known as an asylum. And not just any asylum—a last resort for the criminally insane.

As Dan and his new friends, Abby and Jordan, explore the hidden recesses of their creepy summer home, they soon discover it’s no coincidence that the three of them ended up here. Because the asylum holds the key to a terrifying past. And there are some secrets that refuse to stay buried.

Featuring found photos of unsettling history and real abandoned asylums and filled with chilling mystery and page-turning suspense, Madeleine Roux’s teen debut, Asylum, is a horror story that treads the line between genius and insanity.

The Demonologist by Andrew Pyper


Professor David Ullman is among the world’s leading authorities on demonic literature, with special expertise in Milton’s Paradise Lost. Not that David is a believer—he sees what he teaches as a branch of the imagination and nothing more. So when the mysterious Thin Woman arrives at his office and invites him to travel to Venice and witness a “phenomenon,” he turns her down. She leaves plane tickets and an address on his desk, advising David that her employer is not often disappointed.

That evening, David’s wife announces she is leaving him. With his life suddenly in shambles, he impulsively whisks his beloved twelve-year-old daughter, Tess, off to Venice after all. The girl has recently been stricken by the same melancholy moods David knows so well, and he hopes to cheer her up and distract them both from the troubles at home.

But what happens in Venice will change everything.

First, in a tiny attic room at the address provided by the Thin Woman, David sees a man restrained in a chair, muttering, clearly insane… but could he truly be possessed? Then the man speaks clearly, in the voice of David’s dead father, repeating the last words he ever spoke to his son. Words that have left scars—and a mystery—behind.

When David rushes back to the hotel, he discovers Tess perched on the roof’s edge, high above the waters of the Grand Canal. Before she falls, she manages to utter a final plea: Find me.

What follows is an unimaginable journey for David Ullman from skeptic to true believer. In a terrifying quest guided by symbols and riddles from the pages of Paradise Lost, David must track the demon that has captured his daughter and discover its name. If he fails, he will lose Tess forever.

universitybookstore

universitybookstore:

31 Days of Halloween
The Devil You Say

Who is the embodiment of evil? The Arch-fiend? The Adversary? Well, I think we all know. He goes by many names: Lucifer, Old Harry, Mr. Scratch. If good vs evil is the oldest of all stories, than the Devil is the world’s first villian. Here’s an infernal reading list of Halloween horrors:

  • Rosemary’s Baby by Ira Levin and The Exorcist by William Peter Blatty, were two major horror blockbusters, both as novels and films. It’s hard to imagine now but both titles created controversy as late 60s/early 70s pundits debated whether the works contributed to the “death of God” in an increasing immoral America. However, both have transcended the era of their publication and hold up as classic spinechillers.
  • In I, Lucifer, by Glen Duncan, God gives the Fallen One a last chance to redeem himself before the world ends by inhabiting the body of a struggling writer. Andrew Pyper’s The Demonologist follows Professor David Ullman as he searches for his missing daughter amongst the canals of Venice, led by clues and symbols culled from Milton’s Paradise Lost.
  • Falling Angel by William Hjortsberg follows detective Harry Angel, hired by a mysterious client, in his search for big band-era crooner Johnny Favorite, missing for 16 years, only to find himself enmeshed in the disturbing occult underworld of New York City.
  • Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman offer their own hilarious “interpretation” of the Book of Revelations in Good Omens, where due to a switched-at-birth mix up, the Antichrist was placed with a nice, middle-class English family, which has major implications for the approaching apocalypse.
  • In Between Two Fires, by Christopher Buehlman, Thomas, a disgraced knight, finds an extraordinary orphan girl, who professes to visions of a new war between Heaven and Hell; reluctantly, he agrees to escort her to Avignone through a dangerous countryside ravaged by the Black Death. Also set during the middle ages, Matthew Lewis's classic Gothic novel The Monk charts the diabolical decline of Ambrosio, a pious monk whose first taste of sin sets him upon a depraved path to damnation.
cassandraclare
cassandraclare:

lorvikk:

Malec Baby! I always envision the adopting an adorable warlock baby-girl with bat-like ears. Alec wants to name her Rosie, but Magnus keeps insisting on Sparkles.
Magnus & Alec (c) Cassandra Clare
psst, don’t forget my Christmas Commission offer

Aw, Malec&kid.

Malec and baby <3

cassandraclare:

lorvikk:

Malec Baby! I always envision the adopting an adorable warlock baby-girl with bat-like ears. Alec wants to name her Rosie, but Magnus keeps insisting on Sparkles.

Magnus & Alec (c) Cassandra Clare

psst, don’t forget my Christmas Commission offer

Aw, Malec&kid.

Malec and baby <3